PAEDOPHILE HUNTERS: IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICE COURTS AND PROBATION

The National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) position on paedophile hunting groups is that their motivation should be questioned since there is no positive advantage to policing. Such activism increases risk to potential victims, the suspect, and to the efficiency and effectiveness of criminal justice processes (NPCC, 2018). Whilst public naming and shaming of those convicted of sexual offences against children is not a new phenomenon, the rise in popularity of the internet and the surge in content available online is. Increased accessibility to information made available by paedophile hunters has implications on all aspects of the criminal justice system including policing, courts and probation. Through an examination of the existing literature, this paper outlines how paedophile hunting activity has become a concept in the management of sexual offending in England and Wales.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Race and Criminal/Community Justice

Since our very first issue, the British Journal of Community Justice has sought to examine the potential for restorative practice to be applied to the criminal justice system.

A RAPID EVIDENCE ASSESSMENT TO ASSESS THE OUTCOMES OF COMMUNITY AND CUSTODY DELIVERED VOCATIONAL TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMMES ON REOFFENDING

We undertook a Rapid Evidence Assessment to assess the outcomes of vocational training and employment programmes on reoffending. A meta-analysis of a subset of the most methodologically robust studies found that vocational training and employment programmes were associated with 9 percent fewer programme participants reoffending, when compared with nonparticipants. Studies conducted in the UK were associated with 6 percent fewer programme participants reoffending. However the expected high degree of observed statistical heterogeneity amongst the analysed studies suggests considerable variation in programme effects on recidivism outcomes. It is also possible that publication bias inherent in the reviewed studies may mean that in real terms reductions in recidivism would be marginally lower than our headline findings suggest. This is the first review of this type to combine a review of custodial and community settings, to include a meta-analysis, and to include a number of UK studies.

Editorial (Volume 17, Issue 1)

Reflecting on the findings and recommendations of the MacPherson report, this is the first of a two-part special issue which examines the processes of hate crime (the term now used to include all crime motivated or aggravated by prejudice, not just racism) from the perspectives of victims, victim services, the criminal justice system and perpetrators.

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF UNDERSTANDINGS AND EXPERIENCES OF IMPLEMENTING RESTORATIVE PRACTICE IN THREE UK PRISONS

This paper highlights how qualitative research can enhance causal explanation in impact evaluations and provide additional causal leverage to findings from randomised experiments.

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE AND THE STATE. UNTIMELY OBJECTIONS AGAINST THE INSTITUTIONALISATION OF RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

This paper highlights how qualitative research can enhance causal explanation in impact evaluations and provide additional causal leverage to findings from randomised experiments.

‘GIVING BACK’ BY ‘PAYING BACK’: RECASTING COMMUNITY PAYBACK AS ‘MUTUAL RESTITUTION’ THROUGH FINANCIAL PAYBACK – MAKING A RESTORATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM A REALITY THROUGH CO-OPERATIVES AND VALUES-BASED PURPOSEFUL COMPANIES?

This paper highlights how qualitative research can enhance causal explanation in impact evaluations and provide additional causal leverage to findings from randomised experiments.

MODELS VERSUS MECHANISMS: THE NEED TO CRACK THE BLACK BOX OF RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

This paper highlights how qualitative research can enhance causal explanation in impact evaluations and provide additional causal leverage to findings from randomised experiments.